Tag Archives: word of mouth

Are newspapers still relevant?

Are newspapers dead? The relevance of printed newspapers has been slowly declining since as early as the 1950s with the arrival of television. Today, with the overwhelming popularity of digital media, the demise of printed news may seem inevitable. But despite the death knells, newspapers remain an important part of the media landscape.

In our 2018 Entertainment Survey, Field Day analyzed the role of print newspapers when it comes to choosing a destination or an event. We asked respondents to identify which media they used as a source of information before going to an event or a destination. The chart below compares the responses from February 2016 to those from our most recent survey in February 2018.

The changes in the past two years are significant. Across every age category, newspaper advertising and articles have a much lower impact on people’s entertainment decisions. And it’s safe to predict that these numbers will continue to decline in the coming years.

Is newspaper advertising still relevant for events and destinations?
Tourism organizations, cultural institutions, performing arts and events all seek to attract as wide and diverse a demographic as possible. It therefore makes sense to maintain a wide and diverse media strategy. While the internet offers fantastic possibilities for precise demographic and geographic targeting (as well as the opportunity to tell an immersive and visually engaging story), newspapers still reach important audience segments.

Seniors
Newspaper advertising is the 3rd most important source of information for those 65+ with 38.75% of respondents quoting it as source of information, after television (44.80%) and word of mouth (44.1%).

Cultural Believes
“Cultural believers” (those who regularly attend arts and culture activities) of all ages are more likely than average to read print newspapers. They acknowledge and support the importance and relevance of print media, including books, magazines and newspapers.

Ethnic Communities
Ethnic newspapers are still thriving. They serve an important function in ethnic communities, connecting community members to each other and to their larger community back home, and providing a voice for the community. Ethnic newspaper advertising is a powerful and efficient method of reaching these communities.

With 30 years of delivering marketing strategies & creative solutions for major destination and event brands, Field Day can help you to drive audience growth.

For more information, contact Andrew Arntfield, President at Field Day Inc. at 416.408.4446 Ext: 226

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Who is most likely to attend your destination or event: city dwellers, suburbanites or rural residents?

In our 2018 Entertainment Survey, Field Day analyzed the differences between urban, suburban and rural dwellers when it comes to choosing a destination. The results showed two interesting points of differentiation:

    City dwellers attend more attractions, more often. People living in the city will attend on average 13 unique attractions per year (any entertainment destination including events, museums & galleries, theatre & performing arts, sports, etc.). Meanwhile, people living in suburbs attend 6 attractions, and those living in rural areas attend an average of 4 attractions per year.

    Diversity of attractions: City residents attend a much wider range of attractions than those who live in suburban and rural areas, including both mainstream activities (basketball and baseball, and larger performing arts organizations and museums) as well as more eclectic destinations (independent theatre and performing arts, festivals, cultural events, etc.). The more eclectic the activity, the less likely it is to draw audiences from outside the city core. Those living outside the city are most likely to attend family-oriented activities and sports. In fact, many family-oriented activities are much more likely to draw a suburban or rural audience than city residents.

Is there an opportunity to change this trend? If you are an independent theatre or a performing arts organization, how can you compel suburbanites to attend? If you are a tourist-oriented destination how can you increase your audience share of city dwellers? Our research shows that your advertising media mix can influence your success.

Most popular sources of information

As part of our study, we looked at the media sources that people rely on for information about events and destinations, and we saw that there are differences based on geographic location.

    Facebook is still king. Facebook remains the main source of information whether you live in the city (48.5% of respondents living in the city quoted Facebook as a source) the suburbs (48.55%) or rural areas (50.95%).<
    TV and radio are losing relevance with city dwellers. TV and radio advertising are not very efficient if you want to attract people living in the city (only 23.5% of people living in the city quoted TV as source of information, and 22% quoted radio). However, TV and radio are still a good options to reach suburbanites (34.90% rely of television, 35.9% mentioned radio as a source of information).
    Instagram is on the rise. Instagram is increasingly a popular source of information for people living in the city (24.6% and rising). While it is also increasingly popular among suburbanites and rural people, only 17.4% of suburbanites and 14.55% of rural dwellers quoted Instagram as source of information about events and destinations.

Our needs and biases clearly change depending on our geographic location. Understanding the how attendance patterns and media usage change by geographic location can help you to shape an effective and efficient marketing strategy.

With over 30 years delivering advertising strategies for major destination and event brands, Field can help you to drive audience growth.
For more information, contact Andrew Arntfield, President at Field Day Inc. at 416.408.4446 Ext: 226

CLICK TO DOWNLOAD THE FIELD DAY ENTERTAINMENT SURVEY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY PDF

If your customers aren’t talking, your marketing’s not rocking

We all know that it’s a photo-op-selfie-social-sharing world out there. People never let their phones out of their hands and can’t wait to post their experiences – especially if it’s something new, different or exclusive.
 Here’s the thing, though: it’s not just GenXers and Millennials who are doing the sharing – or paying attention to shared content.

 Our February 2018 Entertainment Survey shows that “word of mouth” is the top influencer for all age groups, and Facebook & Instagram are increasingly popular with older consumers. We’re all checking out each other’s’ experiences, and we’re all influencing each other’s’ entertainment decisions.

Are you creating unique and positive experiences that your audience will share?
 When I attended Art Gallery of Ontario’s “Infinity Mirrors” exhibition everyone from teens to grandparents were eagerly snapping pics. I also overheard complaints. The AGO did an excellent job of managing expectations – making sure patrons understood that there would be long lineups and only 20-seconds of viewing time in each room – but when the hype is so over the top, the reality can be underwhelming. One sentiment I heard more than a few times: “I barely had time to blink and I was being kicked out.” Another telling comment: “It felt more like a cattle herd than an art exhibition.”

 

People share their experiences, both positive and negative. If the experience falls short at any step – from ticket purchase through to post-event follow up – you know people will talk about it. And when “word of mouth” is the most influential medium, it’s crucial to create a positive experience at every step of the customer journey.
 

As part of Field Day’s work for event, destination and cultural organizations, we’ve helped to enhance the entire customer journey and to implement tactics to increase positive word of mouth.