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Top digital marketing trends for 2019

What are the digital marketing trends for 2019 and how can you get ahead of the curve? Field Day has compiled four trends that we believe will have an impact in the coming year.

1. Social Channels are the new storefront

For a while now, e-commerce businesses have had the ability to link to their products or services from their social media posts and ads. However, in 2018, Instagram announced the ability to buy tickets and make reservations right on the Instagram app.
This is a big advance in social commerce, and we expect Instagram (and other platforms) to continue to expand and enhance this business model. We predict that 2019 will bring the ability to add products directly to a cart and complete the purchase – all within the Instagram app. This will remove steps and clicks from the customer journey and the fewer clicks, the more likely you are to complete the sale.

2. Visual search

While voice search gained popularity in 2018, we expect that 2019 will see the emergence of visual search. Amazon, Google and Pinterest are focusing on developing a stronger extension to SEO and will most likely be the main actors. According to Voluum, “Visual Search would identify objects within the image and then search for images related to those objects. For instance, based on an image of a bed, you’d be able to use visual search to shop for an identical or similar bed to the one in the image.”

3. Digital for good

The techlash was one of the defining shifts of 2018, according to Trendwatching. Consumers became aware of how algorithms track our online activities, access and analyze our personal data, and use it to influence our decision making – whether it’s to feed us ads for products it thinks we’ll like, or to influence our political decisions. In 2019 the techlash will continue, and we will see more brands leveraging and promoting their use of digital technology for social good.

4. Amazon will join Facebook and Google to form the digital advertising triopoly

In 2018, Amazon made strong moves in self-serve programmatic advertising, expanding the ability for brands to purchase ad space on its websites and through its ad platform. In the first quarter of 2018, Amazon saw its ad revenue grow 129%, reaching $2.2b. In 2019, expect for Amazon to become a key channel for digital media planners.

With 30 years of marketing experience, Field Day has a deep understanding of digital trends and how to apply them. We can help you to stay ahead of customers’ expectations.

Are newspapers still relevant?

Are newspapers dead? The relevance of printed newspapers has been slowly declining since as early as the 1950s with the arrival of television. Today, with the overwhelming popularity of digital media, the demise of printed news may seem inevitable. But despite the death knells, newspapers remain an important part of the media landscape.

In our 2018 Entertainment Survey, Field Day analyzed the role of print newspapers when it comes to choosing a destination or an event. We asked respondents to identify which media they used as a source of information before going to an event or a destination. The chart below compares the responses from February 2016 to those from our most recent survey in February 2018.

The changes in the past two years are significant. Across every age category, newspaper advertising and articles have a much lower impact on people’s entertainment decisions. And it’s safe to predict that these numbers will continue to decline in the coming years.

Is newspaper advertising still relevant for events and destinations?
Tourism organizations, cultural institutions, performing arts and events all seek to attract as wide and diverse a demographic as possible. It therefore makes sense to maintain a wide and diverse media strategy. While the internet offers fantastic possibilities for precise demographic and geographic targeting (as well as the opportunity to tell an immersive and visually engaging story), newspapers still reach important audience segments.

Seniors
Newspaper advertising is the 3rd most important source of information for those 65+ with 38.75% of respondents quoting it as source of information, after television (44.80%) and word of mouth (44.1%).

Cultural Believes
“Cultural believers” (those who regularly attend arts and culture activities) of all ages are more likely than average to read print newspapers. They acknowledge and support the importance and relevance of print media, including books, magazines and newspapers.

Ethnic Communities
Ethnic newspapers are still thriving. They serve an important function in ethnic communities, connecting community members to each other and to their larger community back home, and providing a voice for the community. Ethnic newspaper advertising is a powerful and efficient method of reaching these communities.

With 30 years of delivering marketing strategies & creative solutions for major destination and event brands, Field Day can help you to drive audience growth.

For more information, contact Andrew Arntfield, President at Field Day Inc. at 416.408.4446 Ext: 226

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How to create word of mouth

Who is most likely to attend your destination or event: city dwellers, suburbanites or rural residents?

In our 2018 Entertainment Survey, Field Day analyzed the differences between urban, suburban and rural dwellers when it comes to choosing a destination. The results showed two interesting points of differentiation:

    City dwellers attend more attractions, more often. People living in the city will attend on average 13 unique attractions per year (any entertainment destination including events, museums & galleries, theatre & performing arts, sports, etc.). Meanwhile, people living in suburbs attend 6 attractions, and those living in rural areas attend an average of 4 attractions per year.

    Diversity of attractions: City residents attend a much wider range of attractions than those who live in suburban and rural areas, including both mainstream activities (basketball and baseball, and larger performing arts organizations and museums) as well as more eclectic destinations (independent theatre and performing arts, festivals, cultural events, etc.). The more eclectic the activity, the less likely it is to draw audiences from outside the city core. Those living outside the city are most likely to attend family-oriented activities and sports. In fact, many family-oriented activities are much more likely to draw a suburban or rural audience than city residents.

Is there an opportunity to change this trend? If you are an independent theatre or a performing arts organization, how can you compel suburbanites to attend? If you are a tourist-oriented destination how can you increase your audience share of city dwellers? Our research shows that your advertising media mix can influence your success.

Most popular sources of information

As part of our study, we looked at the media sources that people rely on for information about events and destinations, and we saw that there are differences based on geographic location.

    Facebook is still king. Facebook remains the main source of information whether you live in the city (48.5% of respondents living in the city quoted Facebook as a source) the suburbs (48.55%) or rural areas (50.95%).<
    TV and radio are losing relevance with city dwellers. TV and radio advertising are not very efficient if you want to attract people living in the city (only 23.5% of people living in the city quoted TV as source of information, and 22% quoted radio). However, TV and radio are still a good options to reach suburbanites (34.90% rely of television, 35.9% mentioned radio as a source of information).
    Instagram is on the rise. Instagram is increasingly a popular source of information for people living in the city (24.6% and rising). While it is also increasingly popular among suburbanites and rural people, only 17.4% of suburbanites and 14.55% of rural dwellers quoted Instagram as source of information about events and destinations.

Our needs and biases clearly change depending on our geographic location. Understanding the how attendance patterns and media usage change by geographic location can help you to shape an effective and efficient marketing strategy.

With over 30 years delivering advertising strategies for major destination and event brands, Field can help you to drive audience growth.
For more information, contact Andrew Arntfield, President at Field Day Inc. at 416.408.4446 Ext: 226

CLICK TO DOWNLOAD THE FIELD DAY ENTERTAINMENT SURVEY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY PDF

The beauty of instagram goes beyond the visual

They swipe up and down, they hold-on, they click, they like, they repost. And they’re doing it at home, at work, in the park, on public transportation, and in every social setting.

Instagram has captured the imaginations of millions of users. And while it’s extremely popular with the younger demographics between the ages of 18 and 34, it’s also exploding in popularity with older generations.

The key to Instagram’s success: its simplicity. It does one thing, and one thing only, really well: sharing visuals of your experiences. It’s fast, easy and immediate. “Look where I am right now! Isn’t It beautiful and cool?” Ego gratification and envy play a big part in our addiction to Instagram.

Instagram is the perfect social media channel for destinations and events to increase desire and yes, envy!

According to Field Day’s 2018 Entertainment Survey, Instagram is the second most popular social media channel to learn about events and destinations, and it’s gaining in popularity daily. How can you leverage it to reach new customers, build desire, and drive attendance?

Stories and LIVE feature:

If “imitation is the sincerest form of flattery”, then Snapchat should be flattered that Instagram copied their “story” and live feed technology. These features allow users to be the storyteller of their own life, creating ongoing real-time diaries of their activities.

For event and destination marketing, Insta’s LIVE and Story can be used to extend the event experience. Brands can use these features to show followers aspects of the event that they otherwise wouldn’t have access to: they can go backstage during a concert, drop in on rehearsals, watch the “real-time” installation of a new exhibit at a gallery, visit with the cast of a play during intermission… all from your sofa at home. When used effectively, you immerse your followers in your experience before they even attend. The end response: “So cool! Next time I’ll definitely book a ticket and I’ll be there”.

An array of ad options – Paid, Sponsored, Targeted:

As an advertising medium, Instagram began as the little brother of Facebook, but brands are discovering the effectiveness of using IG’s features to reach new audiences. The key is to understand how users interact with Instagram. Whether it’s video, image carousels, or retargeted static images, make sure your advertising content is simple, bold and visually compelling so that it stops users from scrolling past it.

Platforms like Instagram are always adding new features (like e-commerce) and it’s crucial for brands to stay current on the features of any platform and look for creative ways to leverage their potential to reach new audiences.

For more information, contact Andrew Arntfield, President at Field Day Inc. at 416.408.4446 Ext: 226

CLICK TO DOWNLOAD THE FIELD DAY ENTERTAINMENT SURVEY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY PDF

Seniors are breaking the internet

Do you remember the uncomfortable feeling you had when your grandmother first commented on one of your Facebook posts? Or when you discovered she had an Instagram account?

Seniors have many reasons for starting their e-journey: Facetiming with their grandkids, texting their friends, managing their money, accessing their local library… Given how digitally connected the world is in 2018, it was inevitable that seniors would find their way online.

Field Day recently studied changes in media use in the two years between February 2016 and February 2018. People were asked to name their sources of information for events and destinations. One of the results of the study: there has been a clear and dramatic rise in use of digital media by those over 65 years of age.

Facebook use by those 65+ increased from 26.92% to 38.24%, Instagram from 0% to 4.41%, and e-mail from 31.45% to 49.29%. Meanwhile, traditional media use declined – especially reliance on newspapers, radio and television.

This trend will continue in the future as tech-savvy boomers move into retirement. As well, our research shows that seniors are looking for activities that provide inner fulfillment and connection to the world around them: travel, arts and culture, philanthropic or community-based activities.

While many organizations are focusing on how to engage young consumers in order to “future proof” themselves, seniors are a viable segment who can be reached with an effective digital marketing strategy. One example: employing senior e-influenceurs.

Field Day understands how and why consumers make their arts, sports, destination and travel decisions. We identify viable target segments for our clients and create compelling marketing campaigns that drive attendance.

For more information, contact Andrew Arntfield, President at Field Day Inc. at 416.408.4446 Ext: 226

CLICK TO DOWNLOAD THE FIELD DAY ENTERTAINMENT SURVEY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY PDF

The limits of digital entertainment

Digital has an increasing impact on how we experience an event. Regardless of our age, we now expect digital engagement as part of our experience – whether it’s an art gallery, a concert or a sports event.

But how far should the relationship between digital and physical entertainment go? Will it reach a point where we skip the actual event for an even better virtual experience?

Field Day’s Account Manager Leah Rose and President Andrew Arntfield give us their perspectives on “digital vs real”.

How to identify and engage new target segments

We’ve all heard someone say “Museums aren’t my thing”, “Baseball is not my thing”, or “Travel isn’t my thing”. No matter what your organization does, whether it’s culture, tourism, sports or an event, there will always be people who have no interest or affinity in your offering.

What is the Culture Bubble?

We all live in bubbles, and our bubbles contain all of our cultural and entertainment interests: the music we love, the events we attend, the leisure activities we enjoy. Everyone’s bubble is different; the size and shape of our bubble is defined by our needs, our biases, and our environment.

The good news is that our consumer research shows that there are clear demographic trends to the Culture Bubble. Field Day has used this data to identify viable new target segments for our clients.
 
If you understand the defining needs and biases of your target segment, you can modify your offering, your messaging or your marketing tactics to meet those needs… and to move your brand INSIDE their Culture Bubble.

As part of Field Day’s work for event, destination and cultural organizations, we’ve helped many venues to attract new target segments.

Is targeted marketing limiting your reach?

There has been a backlash from consumers in the wake of the ongoing news about Facebook and its use of customer data. Yet consumers don’t give much thought to how pervasive online targeting actually is. 

Digital marketing gives us the ability to be extremely precise with our targeting. Are you promoting a tennis tournament? You can target by demographics, geotarget, retarget, or target only those who have a stated interest in tennis. It’s efficient and measurable – important considerations when you’re working with limited advertising dollars.

But when you’re preaching to the converted, aren’t you also limiting your reach?

In this third installment of “Boomer vs Millennial”, Andrew and Leah talk about Facebook, data and targeted marketing.  

If your customers aren’t talking, your marketing’s not rocking

We all know that it’s a photo-op-selfie-social-sharing world out there. People never let their phones out of their hands and can’t wait to post their experiences – especially if it’s something new, different or exclusive.
 Here’s the thing, though: it’s not just GenXers and Millennials who are doing the sharing – or paying attention to shared content.

 Our February 2018 Entertainment Survey shows that “word of mouth” is the top influencer for all age groups, and Facebook & Instagram are increasingly popular with older consumers. We’re all checking out each other’s’ experiences, and we’re all influencing each other’s’ entertainment decisions.

Are you creating unique and positive experiences that your audience will share?
 When I attended Art Gallery of Ontario’s “Infinity Mirrors” exhibition everyone from teens to grandparents were eagerly snapping pics. I also overheard complaints. The AGO did an excellent job of managing expectations – making sure patrons understood that there would be long lineups and only 20-seconds of viewing time in each room – but when the hype is so over the top, the reality can be underwhelming. One sentiment I heard more than a few times: “I barely had time to blink and I was being kicked out.” Another telling comment: “It felt more like a cattle herd than an art exhibition.”

 

People share their experiences, both positive and negative. If the experience falls short at any step – from ticket purchase through to post-event follow up – you know people will talk about it. And when “word of mouth” is the most influential medium, it’s crucial to create a positive experience at every step of the customer journey.
 

As part of Field Day’s work for event, destination and cultural organizations, we’ve helped to enhance the entire customer journey and to implement tactics to increase positive word of mouth.