Tag Archives: consumer trends

Who are Generation Z?

Millennials have been the center of attention for marketers in the past decade. They were (and are) the focus of extensive research, analysis and brand strategies. While Millennials may not have had the disposable income of their parents, marketers were eager to establish lasting relationships that would influence their buying decisions as they developed greater purchasing power. As such, Millennials changed the way companies sell and market their products or services.

As marketers began to look to the subsequent generation, called “Generation Z”, it might have been logical to apply the same marketing strategies. But Gen Z is more than just “Millennials Part II”.

Who is part of Generation Z?

Members of Gen Z were born between 1995 to 2010. They are the first generation to be exposed to the internet, social networks, and mobile systems from birth. That context has produced a generation with unique attitudes and approaches to the world, and who innately blend virtual and offline experiences in their daily life.

Gen Z consumption behaviors

According to a RetailTouchpoint study, 47% of Gen Z consumers research items on mobile devices while shopping at brick-and-mortar locations. By cross-referencing many sources of information, Gen Zers tend to analyze not just what they buy but also why they buy.

Consumption becomes self-expression, and brands that don’t provide meaning and authenticity will be left aside. Instead of global influencers, Gen Z is influenced by their peers: depictions of real people in everyday situations that they can relate to. While Millennial influencer marketing often depicted unattainable “rich and famous” lifestyles, the best Gen Z marketing is both aspirational and within reach of the average Gen Z consumer.

One trait that Gen Zers and Millennials have in common is the desire for personalized products and services. Brands will have to adapt to people’s individual needs, beliefs, and available resources.

Finally, Gen Z expects brands to take a stand and act on ethical issues. While social and ethical issues shouldn’t necessarily be the central focus of a consumer brand, consumers do respect brands that take a clear position on issues that relate directly to their products or services. This is especially true of younger generations.

Generation Z is still developing its attitudes, biases and brand alliances. Gen Z may not yet have the greatest purchasing power, but brands must work to build deep connections with them now, in order to stay relevant and competitive in the future.

Marketing and esports: Understanding the esports fan

Publishers, teams, athletes and broadcasters share a common goal: they want to engage the fans. The more esports can attract and engage fans, the more attractive esports will be to sponsors, advertisers and investors.

But who is the esports fan? Here are some key insights on this growing segment.

The worldwide esports audience reached 395 million in 2018, according to Newzoo, and was expected to grow by 15% in 2019. Fans average 100 minutes per watching session on platforms like Twitch, Mixer or YouTube Gaming.

Asia-Pacific accounts for 57% of the esports enthusiasts, while North America is the largest esports market on a per capita basis, boasting revenues of $409.1 million. The 23.9 million Esports Enthusiasts in North America will generate $17.13 per fan this year, higher than in any other region.

Seven out of ten esports fans are males that range from 18 to 34 years of age with Nielsen reporting that the average age of an esports fan is 26 years old. Most esports fans are young, early adopters, active on social media channels such as Twitter and Reddit, and grew up online or with tech-related interests (video games, media, computers, mobile apps, and IoT).

In fact, it’s reported by Newzoo that among “North American male millennials (age 21 to 35), esports is just as popular as baseball or hockey, with 22% watching it. In North America, the most popular sport in the region, football, is only twice as popular as esports among male millennials. For male viewers between the ages of 36 and 50, football is only three times as popular as esports.”

Reasons why male fans engage with esports:
To learn tips and tricks from the professionals – 44%
Entertainment aspects – 41%
To become a better gamer – 39%
To connect/meet/socialize with other games – 19%
To participate in or see cosplay – 9%

Reasons why female fans engage with esports:
Entertainment aspects – 40%
Learn tips and tricks from the pros – 36%
To become a better gamer – 29%
To connect/meet/socialize with other gamers – 22%
To participate in or see cosplay – 13%

More people watched the finals of the League of Legends World Championship than the Super Bowl in 2018 (approximately 200 million viewers versus 98 million). It is an opportunity brands cannot miss.

Your employees are your brand

What is a QSR brand? Is it your logo and advertising? Or is it your food?

Your brand is the sum total of the entire customer experience: your advertising, your social media activities, the customer service you provide, your community involvement, the restaurant design, the cleanliness of your washrooms… and the quality of your food. Every one of these factors can and will influence the opinion of your customers.

But there’s another aspect to your brand that’s as important as the food: your employees. Many QSRs make sizable investments in-store décor but don’t invest in comprehensive employee training.

QSRs are typically staffed by students working part-time positions. Managers may sometimes not see the value in training them because there is often high staff turnover. However, a well-trained and motivated employee is more likely to remain loyal and not look elsewhere.

The fact is that students are eager to learn and want to do well: there is a sense of well-being and satisfaction that comes from positive achievements.

QSR employees are often provided with basic training on how to assemble the food and serve customers. They may recognize that customer service is important, but not what to do… or why.

They’re told “what” to do, but the “why” is missing from the equation.

• Do your employees understand your brand values and what you stand for as an organization?
• How to they fit into – and contribute to – the delivery of your brand values?
• Do they understand how their contribution helps the company, and how it helps them personally to grow?

Educate your employees on how the skills they learn at your restaurant are life skills and are transferable. They will help them throughout their career and life.

Finally, remember that continued positive reinforcement is not just important but crucial: recognize and reward your employees successes and good work. Do it both in the moment – a quiet “you did a great job with that customer” goes a long way – and in a more formal manner with a rewards program that has achievable goals and rewards.

The end result: you’ll improve employee satisfaction, retain your best employees longer, and enhance your customers’ experience of your brand.

TikTok marketing tips. The new social phenomenon.

TikTok is a social media app for creating and sharing short videos. The app was launched in 2017 by ByteDance. While the app was originally mostly used to share music videos, it’s now a platform to showcase talent of all kinds: skateboarding, stand-up, dancing, fashion… On TikTok everything revolves around “sounds”. Most TikTok videos are up to 15 seconds long, although you can create stories up to 60 seconds in length. TikTok had over 1.1 billion installs as of March 2019, with more than 500 million new users each month.

Who uses TikTok?
66% of TikTok users are under 30 years old and two-thirds are female. TikTok presents a real opportunity to reach Generation Z.

How can brands use TikTok?
As with most social media platforms, brands can create their own channels and upload engaging content. The key to success is to create content that fits within the style and tone that users are accustomed to on TikTok. This means taking a “soft sell” approach and posting content that is entertaining and follows TikTok’s “talent showcase” format. Blatantly commercial content will be viewed negatively by TikTok’s Gen Z user base.

Brands can also work with influencers to spread their message on TikTok. As with Instagram, influencers are very popular on TikTok, with some accounts having up to 32 millions followers.

TikTok has also introduced an advertising platform, currently in beta testing in the US and Europe. Brand takeover, in-feed video, and hashtag challenges are available for advertisers.

“TikTok isn’t just for kids. It may seem so now… but “cool kids” are trendsetters as we all know, and then others follow. At minimum, for any brand that wants to hang out/understand/target the “cool kids” and their followers… they should be on TikTok.”
– Niko Bonatsos, Managing Director of General Catalyst (Invested in Snap)

More info here.

Exclusive inclusivity – Part two: Feeding our social needs

What motivates consumers to attend specific arts, entertainment or sports programming? Recent behavioral research has identified consumer tendencies towards products and experiences which reflect their ideal self-image.

We’ve always been driven by a need for self-actualization and self-fulfillment. We chose to participate in activities and events that bolster our ideal self-image. Are you an Eagles-loving NFL fan, or is an NBA game and DJ Khaled concert more your style?

What’s different today is that we have the social tools that enable these needs: we constantly curate and define our image via our social channels. Our social content says to the world: “here’s who I am.”

But here’s the catch: while we want to stand out from the pack and be seen as individuals, we also tend to seek experiences where we’ll be among our peers and where we’ll feel comfortable.

How does this impact arts, entertainment and sports marketing? The best entertainment marketing communicates “exclusive inclusivity”. It creates an attitude and image that sets the experience apart as unique but that also mirrors the attitude of the target audience. It says “you’re unique, but you’ll also fit in”. It taps into the psychographic needs of its target audience and encourages us to feel good about our decision to attend and about sharing the experience with others.

Our self-image changes over time – as do our entertainment choices. Field Day’s annual research shows clear and predictable differences in our live entertainment choices based on age, gender, education and geographic location. And those differences are influenced by our psychographic needs. The illustration below shows the differences in entertainment choices of an urban female millennial vs a suburban male boomer.

Tapping into the needs, motivations and idealized self-image of your target demographic and creating an atmosphere of “exclusive inclusivity” is key to marketing success.

Is ethical marketing risky?

Ethical marketing has seen a big rise in popularity and effectiveness in the last five years, but consumers are now expecting more from brands in their social actions. In 2019, brands with a clear social conscience are leading the way with consumers. According to the Shelton Group, 86% of consumers want brands to take a stand on social issues. In 2018, few campaigns were more popular than Nike’s Colin Kaepernick ad.

In 2019, consumers want to align themselves with brands that reflect their own ethics and principles. The challenge with ethical marketing is that consumers expect action and not just words and pretty pictures. While consumers sometimes feel powerless to implement social change on a large scale, they know that corporations often have the financial and political clout to influence change.

For example, Starbucks closed 8,000 stores for racial bias training (internal influence), while Patagonia sued the US government in a bid to protect Bears Ears National Monument and coordinated the fight to protect this public land (external influence).

Ethical marketing is far from traditional marketing and it may seem risky. It takes visionary internal leadership to define a company’s moral values and to make them integral to a company’s ethos. It requires close collaboration between operations, public relations and marketing.

But when it’s done right, ethical and social marketing brings to light the core values of a company, and in doing so has a far deeper and longer lasting impact than a traditional ad campaign. It’s not about a product; it’s about a way of living.

Exclusive inclusivity – Part one: Why we attend

If you’re marketing an event, attraction, sport, museum or arts performance, the odds are you’ve gathered demographic data on your customer, and you have a fairly good idea of WHO attends.

But do you know WHY they attend?

If you don’t understand why people engage with your programming your marketing may fail to connect with your audience.

Why do we “attend”? What drives us to get up off the couch, purchase a ticket and go to a play, a gallery, an event or a game? It’s the desire to satisfy deep-set and often intangible values which the participant may not fully understand or be able to articulate.

Until recently, even researchers couldn’t agree on our motivations. One comprehensive research project stated that the most cited motivations for leisure experiences were pleasure and escapism. Another research paper said that the key factors were a shared experience and social engagement. Yet another paper said that consumers were drawn to challenging and socially-engaged leisure activities.

A 2011 study by University of Leeds White Rose University Consortium concluded that “the complex motivations of theatre audiences remain unclear.”

And yet, in the past decade, we’re starting to see patterns emerge in consumer behaviour research. Recent research identifies consumer tendency towards products and experiences which reflect their ideal self-image. This applies equally to packaged goods and ticketed attractions.

This may seem like a shift in motivation, but we’ve always been driven by a need for self-actualization and self-fulfillment – as psychologist Abraham Maslow noted in 1943 in his Hierarchy of Needs.

What’s different in the 21st century is that we have social tools that enable these needs: we constantly curate and define our self-image via our social channels. Twenty years ago when we visited a museum or went to a game, we likely only shared that information with a small circle of family and friends. In 2019, our every activity is shared – often with people whose only contact with us is via social media, and who form their image of us based on the content we share. We have the ability to shape our image via this content – and therefore by the cultural, entertainment and sports activities we choose to attend.

WATCH FOR PART 2 COMING SOON: “Exclusive Inclusivity”: How arts, sports and entertainment can feed our social needs.

Top digital marketing trends for 2019

What are the digital marketing trends for 2019 and how can you get ahead of the curve? Field Day has compiled four trends that we believe will have an impact in the coming year.

1. Social Channels are the new storefront

For a while now, e-commerce businesses have had the ability to link to their products or services from their social media posts and ads. However, in 2018, Instagram announced the ability to buy tickets and make reservations right on the Instagram app.
This is a big advance in social commerce, and we expect Instagram (and other platforms) to continue to expand and enhance this business model. We predict that 2019 will bring the ability to add products directly to a cart and complete the purchase – all within the Instagram app. This will remove steps and clicks from the customer journey and the fewer clicks, the more likely you are to complete the sale.

2. Visual search

While voice search gained popularity in 2018, we expect that 2019 will see the emergence of visual search. Amazon, Google and Pinterest are focusing on developing a stronger extension to SEO and will most likely be the main actors. According to Voluum, “Visual Search would identify objects within the image and then search for images related to those objects. For instance, based on an image of a bed, you’d be able to use visual search to shop for an identical or similar bed to the one in the image.”

3. Digital for good

The techlash was one of the defining shifts of 2018, according to Trendwatching. Consumers became aware of how algorithms track our online activities, access and analyze our personal data, and use it to influence our decision making – whether it’s to feed us ads for products it thinks we’ll like, or to influence our political decisions. In 2019 the techlash will continue, and we will see more brands leveraging and promoting their use of digital technology for social good.

4. Amazon will join Facebook and Google to form the digital advertising triopoly

In 2018, Amazon made strong moves in self-serve programmatic advertising, expanding the ability for brands to purchase ad space on its websites and through its ad platform. In the first quarter of 2018, Amazon saw its ad revenue grow 129%, reaching $2.2b. In 2019, expect for Amazon to become a key channel for digital media planners.

With 30 years of marketing experience, Field Day has a deep understanding of digital trends and how to apply them. We can help you to stay ahead of customers’ expectations.

Are newspapers still relevant?

Are newspapers dead? The relevance of printed newspapers has been slowly declining since as early as the 1950s with the arrival of television. Today, with the overwhelming popularity of digital media, the demise of printed news may seem inevitable. But despite the death knells, newspapers remain an important part of the media landscape.

In our 2018 Entertainment Survey, Field Day analyzed the role of print newspapers when it comes to choosing a destination or an event. We asked respondents to identify which media they used as a source of information before going to an event or a destination. The chart below compares the responses from February 2016 to those from our most recent survey in February 2018.

The changes in the past two years are significant. Across every age category, newspaper advertising and articles have a much lower impact on people’s entertainment decisions. And it’s safe to predict that these numbers will continue to decline in the coming years.

Is newspaper advertising still relevant for events and destinations?
Tourism organizations, cultural institutions, performing arts and events all seek to attract as wide and diverse a demographic as possible. It therefore makes sense to maintain a wide and diverse media strategy. While the internet offers fantastic possibilities for precise demographic and geographic targeting (as well as the opportunity to tell an immersive and visually engaging story), newspapers still reach important audience segments.

Seniors
Newspaper advertising is the 3rd most important source of information for those 65+ with 38.75% of respondents quoting it as source of information, after television (44.80%) and word of mouth (44.1%).

Cultural Believes
“Cultural believers” (those who regularly attend arts and culture activities) of all ages are more likely than average to read print newspapers. They acknowledge and support the importance and relevance of print media, including books, magazines and newspapers.

Ethnic Communities
Ethnic newspapers are still thriving. They serve an important function in ethnic communities, connecting community members to each other and to their larger community back home, and providing a voice for the community. Ethnic newspaper advertising is a powerful and efficient method of reaching these communities.

With 30 years of delivering marketing strategies & creative solutions for major destination and event brands, Field Day can help you to drive audience growth.

For more information, contact Andrew Arntfield, President at Field Day Inc. at 416.408.4446 Ext: 226

Related articles:
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How to create word of mouth

Who is most likely to attend your destination or event: city dwellers, suburbanites or rural residents?

In our 2018 Entertainment Survey, Field Day analyzed the differences between urban, suburban and rural dwellers when it comes to choosing a destination. The results showed two interesting points of differentiation:

    City dwellers attend more attractions, more often. People living in the city will attend on average 13 unique attractions per year (any entertainment destination including events, museums & galleries, theatre & performing arts, sports, etc.). Meanwhile, people living in suburbs attend 6 attractions, and those living in rural areas attend an average of 4 attractions per year.

    Diversity of attractions: City residents attend a much wider range of attractions than those who live in suburban and rural areas, including both mainstream activities (basketball and baseball, and larger performing arts organizations and museums) as well as more eclectic destinations (independent theatre and performing arts, festivals, cultural events, etc.). The more eclectic the activity, the less likely it is to draw audiences from outside the city core. Those living outside the city are most likely to attend family-oriented activities and sports. In fact, many family-oriented activities are much more likely to draw a suburban or rural audience than city residents.

Is there an opportunity to change this trend? If you are an independent theatre or a performing arts organization, how can you compel suburbanites to attend? If you are a tourist-oriented destination how can you increase your audience share of city dwellers? Our research shows that your advertising media mix can influence your success.

Most popular sources of information

As part of our study, we looked at the media sources that people rely on for information about events and destinations, and we saw that there are differences based on geographic location.

    Facebook is still king. Facebook remains the main source of information whether you live in the city (48.5% of respondents living in the city quoted Facebook as a source) the suburbs (48.55%) or rural areas (50.95%).<
    TV and radio are losing relevance with city dwellers. TV and radio advertising are not very efficient if you want to attract people living in the city (only 23.5% of people living in the city quoted TV as source of information, and 22% quoted radio). However, TV and radio are still a good options to reach suburbanites (34.90% rely of television, 35.9% mentioned radio as a source of information).
    Instagram is on the rise. Instagram is increasingly a popular source of information for people living in the city (24.6% and rising). While it is also increasingly popular among suburbanites and rural people, only 17.4% of suburbanites and 14.55% of rural dwellers quoted Instagram as source of information about events and destinations.

Our needs and biases clearly change depending on our geographic location. Understanding the how attendance patterns and media usage change by geographic location can help you to shape an effective and efficient marketing strategy.

With over 30 years delivering advertising strategies for major destination and event brands, Field can help you to drive audience growth.
For more information, contact Andrew Arntfield, President at Field Day Inc. at 416.408.4446 Ext: 226

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