Tag Archives: agency

Who are Generation Z?

Millennials have been the center of attention for marketers in the past decade. They were (and are) the focus of extensive research, analysis and brand strategies. While Millennials may not have had the disposable income of their parents, marketers were eager to establish lasting relationships that would influence their buying decisions as they developed greater purchasing power. As such, Millennials changed the way companies sell and market their products or services.

As marketers began to look to the subsequent generation, called “Generation Z”, it might have been logical to apply the same marketing strategies. But Gen Z is more than just “Millennials Part II”.

Who is part of Generation Z?

Members of Gen Z were born between 1995 to 2010. They are the first generation to be exposed to the internet, social networks, and mobile systems from birth. That context has produced a generation with unique attitudes and approaches to the world, and who innately blend virtual and offline experiences in their daily life.

Gen Z consumption behaviors

According to a RetailTouchpoint study, 47% of Gen Z consumers research items on mobile devices while shopping at brick-and-mortar locations. By cross-referencing many sources of information, Gen Zers tend to analyze not just what they buy but also why they buy.

Consumption becomes self-expression, and brands that don’t provide meaning and authenticity will be left aside. Instead of global influencers, Gen Z is influenced by their peers: depictions of real people in everyday situations that they can relate to. While Millennial influencer marketing often depicted unattainable “rich and famous” lifestyles, the best Gen Z marketing is both aspirational and within reach of the average Gen Z consumer.

One trait that Gen Zers and Millennials have in common is the desire for personalized products and services. Brands will have to adapt to people’s individual needs, beliefs, and available resources.

Finally, Gen Z expects brands to take a stand and act on ethical issues. While social and ethical issues shouldn’t necessarily be the central focus of a consumer brand, consumers do respect brands that take a clear position on issues that relate directly to their products or services. This is especially true of younger generations.

Generation Z is still developing its attitudes, biases and brand alliances. Gen Z may not yet have the greatest purchasing power, but brands must work to build deep connections with them now, in order to stay relevant and competitive in the future.

Marketing and esports: Understanding the esports fan

Publishers, teams, athletes and broadcasters share a common goal: they want to engage the fans. The more esports can attract and engage fans, the more attractive esports will be to sponsors, advertisers and investors.

But who is the esports fan? Here are some key insights on this growing segment.

The worldwide esports audience reached 395 million in 2018, according to Newzoo, and was expected to grow by 15% in 2019. Fans average 100 minutes per watching session on platforms like Twitch, Mixer or YouTube Gaming.

Asia-Pacific accounts for 57% of the esports enthusiasts, while North America is the largest esports market on a per capita basis, boasting revenues of $409.1 million. The 23.9 million Esports Enthusiasts in North America will generate $17.13 per fan this year, higher than in any other region.

Seven out of ten esports fans are males that range from 18 to 34 years of age with Nielsen reporting that the average age of an esports fan is 26 years old. Most esports fans are young, early adopters, active on social media channels such as Twitter and Reddit, and grew up online or with tech-related interests (video games, media, computers, mobile apps, and IoT).

In fact, it’s reported by Newzoo that among “North American male millennials (age 21 to 35), esports is just as popular as baseball or hockey, with 22% watching it. In North America, the most popular sport in the region, football, is only twice as popular as esports among male millennials. For male viewers between the ages of 36 and 50, football is only three times as popular as esports.”

Reasons why male fans engage with esports:
To learn tips and tricks from the professionals – 44%
Entertainment aspects – 41%
To become a better gamer – 39%
To connect/meet/socialize with other games – 19%
To participate in or see cosplay – 9%

Reasons why female fans engage with esports:
Entertainment aspects – 40%
Learn tips and tricks from the pros – 36%
To become a better gamer – 29%
To connect/meet/socialize with other gamers – 22%
To participate in or see cosplay – 13%

More people watched the finals of the League of Legends World Championship than the Super Bowl in 2018 (approximately 200 million viewers versus 98 million). It is an opportunity brands cannot miss.

Your employees are your brand

What is a QSR brand? Is it your logo and advertising? Or is it your food?

Your brand is the sum total of the entire customer experience: your advertising, your social media activities, the customer service you provide, your community involvement, the restaurant design, the cleanliness of your washrooms… and the quality of your food. Every one of these factors can and will influence the opinion of your customers.

But there’s another aspect to your brand that’s as important as the food: your employees. Many QSRs make sizable investments in-store décor but don’t invest in comprehensive employee training.

QSRs are typically staffed by students working part-time positions. Managers may sometimes not see the value in training them because there is often high staff turnover. However, a well-trained and motivated employee is more likely to remain loyal and not look elsewhere.

The fact is that students are eager to learn and want to do well: there is a sense of well-being and satisfaction that comes from positive achievements.

QSR employees are often provided with basic training on how to assemble the food and serve customers. They may recognize that customer service is important, but not what to do… or why.

They’re told “what” to do, but the “why” is missing from the equation.

• Do your employees understand your brand values and what you stand for as an organization?
• How to they fit into – and contribute to – the delivery of your brand values?
• Do they understand how their contribution helps the company, and how it helps them personally to grow?

Educate your employees on how the skills they learn at your restaurant are life skills and are transferable. They will help them throughout their career and life.

Finally, remember that continued positive reinforcement is not just important but crucial: recognize and reward your employees successes and good work. Do it both in the moment – a quiet “you did a great job with that customer” goes a long way – and in a more formal manner with a rewards program that has achievable goals and rewards.

The end result: you’ll improve employee satisfaction, retain your best employees longer, and enhance your customers’ experience of your brand.

Franchising and the Entrepreneurial Mindset

Think back to when you opened your own business. That first location was a labour of love. You sweated over every decision, large and small: products, pricing, suppliers, decor, equipment… You took on a huge risk in launching your own business and nothing happened without your careful consideration.

Within a few years you were successful enough that you started to think about expansion. And that’s when someone whispered the magic word in your ear: “franchising”. Why franchising? It allows you to expand quickly without shouldering the debt and risk. But when franchisees are the ones carrying the financial burden, they want to ensure their investment will pay off. Ideally, they want a say in the decision-making, or at the very least they need to trust that the decisions are being made by a team of qualified professionals.

But you’ve always made all the decisions, and it’s worked so far. Why change? When all of the decisions flow through you, you create a bottleneck and nothing happens quickly. But more importantly, you don’t necessarily have the time or expertise to make effective decisions on every aspect of your growing business.

In your early days, you may have enjoyed designing your own advertising or choosing the colour of your wall paint, but now those tasks are simply distractions from the real work you should be doing. When franchisees see the CEO involved in every minute decision, they will quickly lose trust that they are part of a well-managed organization.

This is when you need to let go of your entrepreneur mindset and relinquish control.

One common solution is to engage your franchisees, share your plans, and solicit their input. But here’s where the danger lies: like you, franchisees are entrepreneurs who don’t necessarily have the expertise to make effective decisions on every area of the business. If you give your franchisees decision-making power you likely won’t get the business results you need.

Make sure you hire qualified professionals in each key area of your business – from franchising to operations – and empower them to do their jobs. This isn’t an issue that’s exclusive to franchising. Regardless of the industry, great leaders know how to delegate. When your franchisees see a management team that is skilled, efficient and effective – and more importantly, when they see the financial results – they’ll recognize that their future is in good hands and you’ll gain their lasting trust.

Exclusive inclusivity – Part one: Why we attend

If you’re marketing an event, attraction, sport, museum or arts performance, the odds are you’ve gathered demographic data on your customer, and you have a fairly good idea of WHO attends.

But do you know WHY they attend?

If you don’t understand why people engage with your programming your marketing may fail to connect with your audience.

Why do we “attend”? What drives us to get up off the couch, purchase a ticket and go to a play, a gallery, an event or a game? It’s the desire to satisfy deep-set and often intangible values which the participant may not fully understand or be able to articulate.

Until recently, even researchers couldn’t agree on our motivations. One comprehensive research project stated that the most cited motivations for leisure experiences were pleasure and escapism. Another research paper said that the key factors were a shared experience and social engagement. Yet another paper said that consumers were drawn to challenging and socially-engaged leisure activities.

A 2011 study by University of Leeds White Rose University Consortium concluded that “the complex motivations of theatre audiences remain unclear.”

And yet, in the past decade, we’re starting to see patterns emerge in consumer behaviour research. Recent research identifies consumer tendency towards products and experiences which reflect their ideal self-image. This applies equally to packaged goods and ticketed attractions.

This may seem like a shift in motivation, but we’ve always been driven by a need for self-actualization and self-fulfillment – as psychologist Abraham Maslow noted in 1943 in his Hierarchy of Needs.

What’s different in the 21st century is that we have social tools that enable these needs: we constantly curate and define our self-image via our social channels. Twenty years ago when we visited a museum or went to a game, we likely only shared that information with a small circle of family and friends. In 2019, our every activity is shared – often with people whose only contact with us is via social media, and who form their image of us based on the content we share. We have the ability to shape our image via this content – and therefore by the cultural, entertainment and sports activities we choose to attend.

WATCH FOR PART 2 COMING SOON: “Exclusive Inclusivity”: How arts, sports and entertainment can feed our social needs.

Top sports marketing trends for 2019

What are the sports marketing trends for 2019 and how can you get ahead of the curve? Field Day has compiled three trends that we believe will have a big impact in the coming year. From weak signals to megatrends, these trends have already started to impact sponsorships, distribution, and even teams. Whether you are a team, sports organization or a business looking for opportunities in this sector, those trends should be considered in your 2019 marketing planning.

1. A flexible ticket sales strategy brings new customers

Freedom and flexibility are key customer strategies for any business. Leading sports franchises understand that not every fan can afford a full season package, and fans don’t necessarily want to be restricted to a specific number of seats for each game. Teams have long offered “mini packs” with a pre-defined set of games and “flex packs” where fans can choose their own games.

Some teams are now taking flexibility to the next level. The New York Jets have launched the first subscription-based mobile passes that allow fans to attend a predetermined number of games for a flat fee.

Organizations like the New Jersey Devils offer a “banking” system membership, whereby fans choose to make an advance deposit into an account, which is debited to purchase tickets throughout the season. Fans have the ability to choose from any game and any ticket quantity at discounted prices. They can purchase a single ticket or a block of tickets to a game. It’s a ticketing strategy that’s attracting a wider base of customers who appreciate that their favourite team is responding to their varied needs and interests.

2. Learning from the explosive growth of eSports

Efforts to commercialize esports and harness its audience engagement power are intensifying, and the sector is primed for further strong growth.

Sponsorships are bringing the money, representing 40% of the total market revenues. In Germany, McDonald’s switched from soccer to esports sponsorship, partnering with the German National Championship for video games, and ending a long time relationship with the German Football Association.

Smart sport organizations are redefining what it means to be a “customer”. It goes beyond “bums in seats” and merchandising. Teams can continue to expand the fan experience and can learn from esports innovations, particularly in fan engagement, live streaming and the event experience.

3. Tech giants will find their sports business model

In developed markets, pay television has been the engine of media revenue growth for two decades or more. It is clear that this model is being disrupted. The tech giants, particularly Facebook and Amazon, are challenging traditional sports media with Facebook acquiring the rights to the Spanish soccer league “La Liga” for the Indian subcontinent. The social network already broadcasts MLS in the United States at a reported cost of $1m per game, according to Nielsen. As with the rest of Facebook, the content is free but supported by targeted advertising.

Speaking to Reuters, Facebook’s director of global live sports said the La Liga streams would at first be advertising free, but it was considering how best to monetize them in the future.

The internet has globalized the fan base for teams, and in 2019 sports leagues and teams need to rethink their broadcast models. Fans wants and expect to be able to access every game from any location. Local blackouts only penalize your most die-hard customers. Just like flexible ticket packages, when leagues negotiate broadcast rights, they need to keep fan freedom and flexibility as the primary objective.

With 30 years of sports marketing experience, Field Day knows how to reach fans for sports brands and organizations. We can help you to stay ahead of customers’ expectations.