Tag Archives: 2019

Collision (of) Course.

Aside from the star-studded cast of actors, business tycoons and athletes, I didn’t know what to expect with Collision 2019.
 
As a Collision noob, I took this opportunity to learn, but more importantly find inspiring stories and start-ups with interesting trajectories. Let’s face it – we live in some tough times, and the world needs a lot more positivity.
 
Upon arriving, I instantly got the impression this was going to be unlike any other conference I’d attended. As a creative, it’s my job to feel out trends and to seek out what works and what doesn’t. For me, Collision was about the struggles and challenges small business faces day in and day out. The hustle was strong, and the pitches were equally so. Many were nervous, and some were less polished. Either way, it was refreshing to see so many bold ideas pushed into a public space for all to see.
 
Going through the schedule, I knew of most of the heavyweight speakers, so I sought out speakers who were new to me.
 
With that in mind, here are my top three moments of Collision 2019.
 
Marketing Amid Disruption with Linda Boff
(Chief Marketing Officer at GE)
What struck me about Linda’s keynote was how she was able to pivot General Electric’s 127-year-old brand to be more in tune with today’s energy conversation. Their clean Instagram feed not only highlights their innovations, it includes the human aspect. People make these achievements possible.
https://www.instagram.com/generalelectric/?hl=en   
 

In Defense of the “Jack-Of-All-Trades” with Graham McDonnell 
(Creative Director, New York Times)
Graham’s talk resonated with me on various levels. We’re both musicians, both creatives, and both struggle with trying to take on everything. He spent 30 minutes diving deep into the Specialist vs Generalist debate, and by the end I asked myself one question: Where would I be if I didn’t try to at least learn one more thing?
Here is a link to his bio.
 
Leadership Lessons
Terrell Owens (Professional athlete), Ryan Holmes (Hootsuite), Alex Kantrowitz (Buzzfeed)
These three speakers were brutally honest and as hard as nails in telling it like it is. Determination and perseverance are among the most important keys to success. As an athlete, I’ve learned that what you put in is what you get out. If you take short cuts, in business or in life, your performance undoubtably suffers.

Click here for more info on Collision 2020!

Exclusive inclusivity – Part two: Feeding our social needs

What motivates consumers to attend specific arts, entertainment or sports programming? Recent behavioral research has identified consumer tendencies towards products and experiences which reflect their ideal self-image.

We’ve always been driven by a need for self-actualization and self-fulfillment. We chose to participate in activities and events that bolster our ideal self-image. Are you an Eagles-loving NFL fan, or is an NBA game and DJ Khaled concert more your style?

What’s different today is that we have the social tools that enable these needs: we constantly curate and define our image via our social channels. Our social content says to the world: “here’s who I am.”

But here’s the catch: while we want to stand out from the pack and be seen as individuals, we also tend to seek experiences where we’ll be among our peers and where we’ll feel comfortable.

How does this impact arts, entertainment and sports marketing? The best entertainment marketing communicates “exclusive inclusivity”. It creates an attitude and image that sets the experience apart as unique but that also mirrors the attitude of the target audience. It says “you’re unique, but you’ll also fit in”. It taps into the psychographic needs of its target audience and encourages us to feel good about our decision to attend and about sharing the experience with others.

Our self-image changes over time – as do our entertainment choices. Field Day’s annual research shows clear and predictable differences in our live entertainment choices based on age, gender, education and geographic location. And those differences are influenced by our psychographic needs. The illustration below shows the differences in entertainment choices of an urban female millennial vs a suburban male boomer.

Tapping into the needs, motivations and idealized self-image of your target demographic and creating an atmosphere of “exclusive inclusivity” is key to marketing success.

Is ethical marketing risky?

Ethical marketing has seen a big rise in popularity and effectiveness in the last five years, but consumers are now expecting more from brands in their social actions. In 2019, brands with a clear social conscience are leading the way with consumers. According to the Shelton Group, 86% of consumers want brands to take a stand on social issues. In 2018, few campaigns were more popular than Nike’s Colin Kaepernick ad.

In 2019, consumers want to align themselves with brands that reflect their own ethics and principles. The challenge with ethical marketing is that consumers expect action and not just words and pretty pictures. While consumers sometimes feel powerless to implement social change on a large scale, they know that corporations often have the financial and political clout to influence change.

For example, Starbucks closed 8,000 stores for racial bias training (internal influence), while Patagonia sued the US government in a bid to protect Bears Ears National Monument and coordinated the fight to protect this public land (external influence).

Ethical marketing is far from traditional marketing and it may seem risky. It takes visionary internal leadership to define a company’s moral values and to make them integral to a company’s ethos. It requires close collaboration between operations, public relations and marketing.

But when it’s done right, ethical and social marketing brings to light the core values of a company, and in doing so has a far deeper and longer lasting impact than a traditional ad campaign. It’s not about a product; it’s about a way of living.

Franchising and the Entrepreneurial Mindset

Think back to when you opened your own business. That first location was a labour of love. You sweated over every decision, large and small: products, pricing, suppliers, decor, equipment… You took on a huge risk in launching your own business and nothing happened without your careful consideration.

Within a few years you were successful enough that you started to think about expansion. And that’s when someone whispered the magic word in your ear: “franchising”. Why franchising? It allows you to expand quickly without shouldering the debt and risk. But when franchisees are the ones carrying the financial burden, they want to ensure their investment will pay off. Ideally, they want a say in the decision-making, or at the very least they need to trust that the decisions are being made by a team of qualified professionals.

But you’ve always made all the decisions, and it’s worked so far. Why change? When all of the decisions flow through you, you create a bottleneck and nothing happens quickly. But more importantly, you don’t necessarily have the time or expertise to make effective decisions on every aspect of your growing business.

In your early days, you may have enjoyed designing your own advertising or choosing the colour of your wall paint, but now those tasks are simply distractions from the real work you should be doing. When franchisees see the CEO involved in every minute decision, they will quickly lose trust that they are part of a well-managed organization.

This is when you need to let go of your entrepreneur mindset and relinquish control.

One common solution is to engage your franchisees, share your plans, and solicit their input. But here’s where the danger lies: like you, franchisees are entrepreneurs who don’t necessarily have the expertise to make effective decisions on every area of the business. If you give your franchisees decision-making power you likely won’t get the business results you need.

Make sure you hire qualified professionals in each key area of your business – from franchising to operations – and empower them to do their jobs. This isn’t an issue that’s exclusive to franchising. Regardless of the industry, great leaders know how to delegate. When your franchisees see a management team that is skilled, efficient and effective – and more importantly, when they see the financial results – they’ll recognize that their future is in good hands and you’ll gain their lasting trust.

How Instagram checkout works

Instagram has changed the way we consume fashion, food, and even entertainment. Most importantly, it has become a powerful window display for a new generation of brands and shoppers. It was inevitable for Instagram to get into mobile commerce. Late in March 2019, Instagram introduced the checkout feature, which allows consumers to purchase products without leaving the app. This new initiative is in closed beta for businesses, and currently available to the US market only.

How it works for the consumer

Checkout tags will show up on brands’ stories and feed. Instagram did not specify whether the tag could appear through influencer’s posts. When users tap the post to reveal the product tag, they will see a checkout option that replaces the current “view on website”. On their first purchase only, they will enter their payment information, which will be saved for future purchases. After their order, users will be able to track the package with a new “Orders” section on their profile with options to return, contact the merchant, or cancel the order.

How it works for the seller

In addition to having a more appealing ad platform, Instagram will generate revenue by charging the seller a nominal fee per transaction. While the selling fee hasn’t been revealed, Instagram did communicate that prices will not change for consumers. This means that sellers will have to cut their margin instead.
Instagram is accelerating mobile commerce. Will you be ahead of your competitors and conquer the “Social shopping” market?

Top digital marketing trends for 2019

What are the digital marketing trends for 2019 and how can you get ahead of the curve? Field Day has compiled four trends that we believe will have an impact in the coming year.

1. Social Channels are the new storefront

For a while now, e-commerce businesses have had the ability to link to their products or services from their social media posts and ads. However, in 2018, Instagram announced the ability to buy tickets and make reservations right on the Instagram app.
This is a big advance in social commerce, and we expect Instagram (and other platforms) to continue to expand and enhance this business model. We predict that 2019 will bring the ability to add products directly to a cart and complete the purchase – all within the Instagram app. This will remove steps and clicks from the customer journey and the fewer clicks, the more likely you are to complete the sale.

2. Visual search

While voice search gained popularity in 2018, we expect that 2019 will see the emergence of visual search. Amazon, Google and Pinterest are focusing on developing a stronger extension to SEO and will most likely be the main actors. According to Voluum, “Visual Search would identify objects within the image and then search for images related to those objects. For instance, based on an image of a bed, you’d be able to use visual search to shop for an identical or similar bed to the one in the image.”

3. Digital for good

The techlash was one of the defining shifts of 2018, according to Trendwatching. Consumers became aware of how algorithms track our online activities, access and analyze our personal data, and use it to influence our decision making – whether it’s to feed us ads for products it thinks we’ll like, or to influence our political decisions. In 2019 the techlash will continue, and we will see more brands leveraging and promoting their use of digital technology for social good.

4. Amazon will join Facebook and Google to form the digital advertising triopoly

In 2018, Amazon made strong moves in self-serve programmatic advertising, expanding the ability for brands to purchase ad space on its websites and through its ad platform. In the first quarter of 2018, Amazon saw its ad revenue grow 129%, reaching $2.2b. In 2019, expect for Amazon to become a key channel for digital media planners.

With 30 years of marketing experience, Field Day has a deep understanding of digital trends and how to apply them. We can help you to stay ahead of customers’ expectations.

4 hot consumer and marketing trends for 2019

What are the upcoming media and marketing trends for 2019 and how can you get ahead of the curve? Field Day looked at a number of studies and we’ve compiled four trends that we believe will have an impact in the coming year. From weak signals to megatrends, those four trends have already started to impact our culture, and should be considered in your 2019 marketing planning.

1. Escape
In 2018 we were inundated with non-stop polarizing news. From the moment we awoke to a push notification on your phone, to the late night talk shows, it was the year of pro-Trump/anti-Trump, pro-Brexit/anti-Brexit, Apple vs. Samsung, #ilikebeer… For many, we’ve passed the saturation point and the anxiety and stress have become too much.

The result: we all need an escape. Trendwatching describes the 2019 consumer as “an escape artist, able to plug into a universe of their choosing”. From fantasy sports leagues to Fortnite, escaping the real world is becoming more and more important for consumers.

If your customer is escaping via Fortnite, you need to plug your brand into the Fortnite universe. Perhaps your customer demographic escapes to the oasis of art galleries or museums… or to spa getaways. As marketers, look at your customer demographics, determine the type of escape scenarios they are most likely to plug into, and then engage with them through that world. Better yet, create your own escape for your customers.

2. Body first
“Consumers are treating their bodies like an ecosystem and seeking solutions that complement their personal health and evolving needs.” This is a major trend highlighted by Mintel.

More than ever, in 2019 we will pay more attention to our health and choose activities that support this health-first self-image. Brands that respect and support the health of their customers will have a clear advantage. Supporting a healthy lifestyle can take many forms. For example, Timeshifter is an app that provides personalized plans to help people adjust to new timezones when traveling. Intermarche launched a pack of yogurt that contains the same recipe with decreasing amounts of sugar, to help consumers in their “sugar detox”. Is your brand doing its part to reduce energy usage? If so, make it part of your brand message.

As a brand, think about all the ways you currently support your customers’ healthy lifestyle, determine what additional “healthy” changes you can make to your processes, products or services, and brainstorm new innovations to improve your “health-focused” customer journey.

3. “Social” is more than an online marketing platform
Social marketing has seen a big rise in popularity and effectiveness in the last five years, but consumers are now expecting more from brands in their social feeds. In 2019, brands with a clear social conscience will lead the way with consumers. According to Shelton Group, 86% of consumers want brands to take a stand on social issues. In 2018, few campaigns were more popular than Nike’s Colin Kaepernick ad.

Consumers expect action more than words and pretty pictures. They want to align themselves with brands that reflect their own ethics and principles. For example, Starbucks closed 8,000 stores for racial bias training, while Patagonia sued the US government in a bid to protect Bears Ears National Monument and coordinated the fight to protect this public land.

4. Virtual companions
According to Nielsen, nearly a quarter of US households own a smart speaker. Today you can own a virtual assistant that can entertain, educate, mentor and even be a friend. Your Google assistant can place a phone call to book a restaurant or a hairdresser appointment. IBM launched an IA bot that mentors young entrepreneurs. KLM launched a city trip assistant: see it here.

AI is improving exponentially in speed and accuracy. Brands can respond instantly to consumer queries, and consumers receive efficient, immediate customer service, In 2019, consumers will expect even more, and better, AI assistance from brands. And they will be quick to reject unresponsive brands.

Beyond speed, brands should consider how their AI experience reflects their overall brand experience. According to Trendwatching, 72% of smart speaker users think “brands should have unique voices and personalities for their apps/skills and not just use the assistant on my phone”. How will you bring your brand to life through your virtual assistant?

Field Day has a deep understanding of consumer trends and how to apply them, and we can help you stay ahead of customer expectations and your competitors.